In Response to “A Letter to Patients”

Go read A Letter to Patients With Chronic Disease before you even finish reading what I’m about to say.

A twitter friend of mine Lisa sent me this a while back. I’ve read it at least a couple dozen times. Each time I read through it, it provokes a different reaction deep within me. At times, I’m thankful someone is willing to be so honest. At other times, I’m so angered by the brutal honesty of it.

Here’s what I mean:

Dr. Rob offers up this bit of information to chronic pain sufferers. He says, “You scare doctors”. My initial response is, “Well I hope so! I’m scared to. Even though I wouldn’t admit it to the outside world. Fix me!! Once I’ve calmed down, I realize this is helpful information.

Continuing on he says,

I am talking about your understanding of a fact that everyone else seems to miss, a fact that many doctors hide from: we are normal, fallible people who happen to doctor for a job. We are not special. In fact, many of us are very insecure, wanting to feel the affirmation of people who get better, hearing the praise of those we help. We want to cure disease, to save lives, to be the helping hand, the right person in the right place at the right time

Often times, as a patient, I do forget that doctors are human. They are not a God or any other higher power. They all went to school, studied from books and all have their own opinions. THAT is important for me to remember. Just like members of my family, friends, or the guy in the grocery store staring at my cane; doctors all have their own opinions about my pain and fatigue.

So it makes sense to me that if I choose to push the negative nay-saying friends and family out of my life, what’s to say I shouldn’t do the same with doctors?

Dr. Rob also makes a point that doctors can’t possibly understand what your going through. Just like we have come to accept that the people in our daily lives couldn’t possibly understand our pain, we need to accept this of our doctors.

Even doctors who specialize in your disorder don’t share the kind of knowledge you can only get through living with a disease.

Makes sense to me.

Dr. Rob also goes on to list some helpful tips when interacting with doctors. I highly suggest you go take a look.

What I’m left with is this…my primary doctor, my MS specialist, the ER physician…is someone’s daughter, son, brother, wife, fiancé or father. They are just a person who set out in their life to help people. Then *I came along, not their typical patient. I screwed with everything they learned. I defied their books and challenged their knowledge of disease and pain. Why shouldn’t they be frustrated? I know I am.

Food for thought.

20130528-100243.jpg

Advertisements

One thought on “In Response to “A Letter to Patients”

  1. I really liked the docs honesty. Ihave faced several of his scenarios with many doctors. To be honest I don’t think I have often thought about how a doc feels about havingto treat someone with all of my many health issues. It has to be disheartening for them as well. The whole ” what the hell does she expect me to do for her now?” I know it sucks to have this many problems to try to deal with, I live it day in day out. I just get wrapped up in doing the best I can about as much as I can and perhaps I don’t look at things from the docs point of view closely enough. I’m sure most of them wouldn’t choose someone like me for a patient, but there I am wanting help from them. All they want is for me to get well and pay them and go on my merry way. I can’t be an easy patient to deal with. Some of them aren’t easy either,but we do need the partnership to be as effective as possible…for both of us,however a little more respect from both sides couldn’t hurt. This article needs to be shared and shared some more, but at least it is a good starting place. Thanks for sharing.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s